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oregano roasted brassicas with maple + dijon dressing

Brassicas = mustard-y cabbages, brussels, broccoli, cauliflower etc goodness. This hearty winter salad is one of the better things I’ve made as of late. As you can see, it’s unapologetically golden brown. I’ve tried before to roast these babies and keep some green intact for the sake of aesthetic presentation, but for real? The more brown edged bits abounding, the better. Embrace the brown.

It has the aforementioned winter vegetables, light sweetness, sharp dijon plus so many textures and things popping at once. It’s a bit of a riff on a brussels sprouts dish I was into last year–the roasting treatment, a strong acidic component, the crunchy hazelnuts and a heavy dusting of pomegranate arils (love that word). This time I invited some other brassica buddies to the party, changed up the vinaigrette and steeped the roasting oil with Mexican oregano and a smashed garlic clove before I slid the veg into a really hot oven. The sour and juicy hits of pomegranate burst on the palette just when you need something to tame the overall heft of it.

My mother tells a really good story about the first time she tried a pomegranate as a child.  A girl had brought one to school and shared it with her. Alight from the experience, she came home and told my Nana about it. The mysterious new fruit! So delicious, fun to eat and completely beautiful! Like any good mum, my Nana went right to the Italian market and splurged on one so that they could share it together at home. Maybe this isn’t so much a story as it is a nice way to remember my favourite ladies: a mini version of my mum picking out the little jewel-like seeds and showing them to my Nana for the first time and maybe a small amount of griping about how much work it was to actually eat the thing. Warm fuzzies are still pretty much guaranteed every time I cut into the fuschia holiday staple.

That sweet image was on my mind again when I was watching some morning news the day after we got back from a little time in Costa Rica. Young girls were full-on convulsing/crying at the hands of a Justin Bieber ticket giveaway gone awry. It was an instance of recognition that went along the lines of “Oh right, this continues to exist in the world.” I guess I wasn’t ready for it. Maybe someone should give those gals a pomegranate? Anyway. (No judgment–all love for Biebz) (But seriously, those young ladies would cry way too hard if someone gave them a pomegranate).

This could serve a lot of your peeps at a festive gathering for sure. If you’re like me, it MIGHT carry you over three lunches once you store it in the fridge. I couldn’t stop eating it, seriously. I went from tropical fruit breakfasts, ceviche all the time and 30+ Celsius beach days to some serious cold and gray Canadian winter vibes rather quickly. Pulling on the woolies, lots of hot tea, basking in some twinkle-lit glow, cozy music and giant (GIANT) bowls of cabbage-y darlings sprinkled with pomegranate and hazelnuts have all been pretty great things.

Hope you’re all easing into holiday time with lots of joy, gratefulness and cup-overflowing-levels of abundant health. Be kind, say thank you and eat some vegetables, friends. Big love to you all.

roasted brassica toss with pomegranate, hazelnuts + maple dijon dressing
serves: a crowd
notes: I meant to throw a handful of crumbled sheep’s milk feta into this, but completely forgot pre-photo. It’s delicious without it, certainly, but dang if it wasn’t on a whole other level afterward. If you got it, do it.

vegetables + roasting oil:
1/4 cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
1 clove of garlic, smashed and peeled (reserve after steeping)
1 tsp dried mexican orgeano
1 lb brussels sprouts, trimmed + quartered
1 small head of cauliflower, trimmed + broken into bite-size florets
1 bunch of broccoli, stems trimmed + sliced, florets broken off
salt + pepper

dressing:
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp filtered water
1 tbsp maple syrup
2 tsp dijon mustard
reserved garlic clove
salt + pepper
1/3 cup grapeseed oil

salad:
1 small pomegranate, seeds removed (a good guide can be found here)
1/4 cup whole hazelnuts, toasted + chopped

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a very large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

Make the roasting oil for the vegetables: in a small saucepan over low heat, combine the 1/4 cup grapeseed oil, garlic clove and oregano. Bring it to a very faint simmer, remove from the heat and let the mix steep for 10 minutes or so while you trim the veg. Fish out the garlic clove and reserve it for the dressing.

In a large bowl, combine the brussels sprouts, cauliflower florets, broccoli stems and florets with the oregano oil, salt and pepper. Toss until all vegetables are coated. Place vegetables on the parchment lined baking sheet and roast in the oven until golden brown, about 25 minutes. Flip them around here and there.

Make the dressing: combine all dressing components in a blender and blitz a few times until a homogenous mix is achieved and the garlic clove is completely pureed. Check for seasoning and set aside.

Toss the roasted vegetables with the vinaigrette, pomegranate seeds and chopped hazelnuts. Place salad in your serving dish and garnish with a few more pomegranate seeds and nuts. Can be served warm or room temperature.

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Carrie | acookgrowsinbrooklyn05/12/2012 - 11:39 am

Giiirrl, you know I get down with the roasted brassicas. Pomegranates – not so much – but any friend of roasted cauliflower and brussels and broccoli is a friend of mine. And so, watch out pomegranates, I’m coming for you.

Eileen05/12/2012 - 3:15 pm

These sound great! And, lucky me, I have cauliflower, broccoli, and brussels sprouts just waiting in my crisper…

Lindsay05/12/2012 - 11:01 pm

I want to eat this right now! I think I would also throw in some beets. But mainly because I am craving roasted beets and goat cheese together. With the other brassica’s it would be simply divine. Thanks for sharing and glad to hear you had a lovely vacation :)

Hannah06/12/2012 - 12:00 am

Roasted veg with vinaigrette is a big favorite here – with pomegranate will be something new. Can’t wait to give it a go. Welcome back, stay warm, happy December …

Kathryne06/12/2012 - 12:18 am

I stocked up on brussels sprouts at the store today. Sprouts for days! Roasted really is the way to go and this dish sounds absolutely fantastic. “all love for Biebz.” You make me smile, Laura. :)

Kathryn06/12/2012 - 6:16 am

This salad sounds properly magical. All that sweetness from the roasted vegetables and the tartness of the dressing and the saltiness of the feta that you suggested. Perfect.

Big love to you too Laura.

Courtney06/12/2012 - 12:44 pm

This looks like the perfect combination of flavors and textures suited for this time of year. Yum!!

sarah07/12/2012 - 2:02 am

I can never not call him Biebz now. And yes, give those girls a pomegranate. That should be a t-shirt. But it could mean all kinds of things.

This looks delicious! I love your recipes. xo

Elizabeth09/12/2012 - 10:50 pm

I love every single thing about this. The food, the stories, even the poignant reminder that Bieber fever is no joke. Cheers to coziness, kindness, pomegranates and brassica love.

kelsey11/12/2012 - 2:20 pm

Brassica Buddy. NEW FAVORITE TERM OF ENDEARMENT.

Edna Silveira31/03/2013 - 9:47 am

Salada com romã… deve ficar muito boa!!!!

[…] Oregano Roasted Brassicas with Maple + Dijon Dressing […]

Sarune16/10/2013 - 6:28 am

Great recipe! I tryed it last night and it came out so well.

Eliza08/12/2013 - 5:35 pm

This recipe was a huge hit at thanksgiving! I I too couldn’t get enough of the leftovers. To my pleasant surprise, the pomegranate seeds even microwaved okay. My new go-to for pot lucks. Thanks!

spelt focaccia with seeds, thyme + caramelized onions


Everyone should learn how to make bread. I’m not being an idealist on this. It is a chief form of sustenance for many of course, but it is also a deeply meditative undertaking when you get yourself into it. There are repetitive motions to sink every strand of your awareness into, astute measures, risings to patiently wait for and monitor, that universally smile-inducing warm smell… Whole body, whole mind, loaves of bread. We all have the ability to bang it out; just a simple awakening to its powers is perhaps necessary. See where I’m going with this?

I’ve winded down to a bit of vacation time currently, it’s true —publishing this one from somewhere in Costa Rica, hopefully out in the surf at this point *waves hello*—, but deadlines, actual scheduled work, and loose ends abounded before an obligatory rum on the rocks found its way into my hot little hands by the ocean. I didn’t really know which of the umpteen-jillion things on my list I was supposed to finish first. So I did something that wasn’t on my list, or rather something that I didn’t know was on my list just yet. I made bread. (And listened to some 90s/early 2000s R&B).

Walking into any kitchen in any capacity to make bread with whatever equipment available is completely badass to me. Providing basic sustenance on a whim = a life skill supreme. Some of the coolest people I’ve met in my life were serious bread bakers and eventually I figured out why. I started to appreciate what the practice offered when I had to make it every day at a restaurant I worked at for a time. There is a slowness that you have to learn how to appreciate when you make it. It was such a non-stop-work-all-the-time period of my life (an aside: that is still actually a thing), but the small responsibility brought me some serious calm and quietude. So it was then, here I am now; hands in the flour working it all out.

This recipe from Kim Boyce is completely simple to remember. Focaccia is generally considered a good beginner’s bread undertaking. Equal amounts of whole grain and plain/softer flour, packet of quick yeast, fat pinch of salt, glugs of olive oil and whatever flavour/textural components you’re feeling at the moment. Easy.

I went very classic with this. Caramelized onions become the flavour salve of dreams in cool weather, going on everything to make it instantly better. Fresh thyme is easily my favourite herb, so it’s always poking out of some spot in the fridge, and I generally enjoy the crunch-surprise of seeds in almost everything bread-related (bagel memories, guys). Other ideas: dried figs, olives, roasted bits of squash, fried sage leaves, concord grapes if you still have them around, walnuts, a firm blue cheese (drizzle the whole thing with honey at the end-oooooh man), dabs of harissa and almonds etc etc.

spelt + seed focaccia with caramelized onions + thyme
very lightly adapted from Kim Boyce’s Good to the Grain
serves:
makes a large rectangular focaccia 
notes: 
If you want to age the dough a bit for a hint of sourness/more depth, tightly cover the dough after the first rising and place it in the fridge. When you’re ready to bake it, remove from the fridge well in advance so that the dough can come to room temperature and then follow through with the second rising and baking steps.

1 package quick rise yeast (2.25 teaspoons)
1 tsp raw honey (or natural sugar)
1.5 cups whole grain flour (I used spelt)
1.5 cups light spelt flour (or unbleached all purpose)
1 tbsp flaky/sort of coarse salt (I used Himalayan pink salt)
1/4 cup + 2 tbsp olive oil + extra to grease the bowl
4 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed
big handful of raw sunflower seeds
1 onion, peeled and cut into half moons
splash of sherry vinegar (optional)
coarse salt

Grease a medium-large bowl AND a large baking sheet with some olive oil. Pro tip: place a sheet of parchment on the baking sheet too to prevent heart-wrenching bread sticking (guess who forgot to do that..). Set both the bowl and the baking sheet aside.

In a large bowl, or the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the packet of yeast, honey/sugar and 1 1/4 cups warm water. Stir them together. Let the mixture sit for 5 minutes or so. The yeast should bubble a bit, seem foamy on the surface and bloom.

To the yeast mixture, add the flours, salt and 2 tbsp olive oil. Mix it all together to combine.

If you’re using a stand mixer: attach the dough hook and knead the mixture for 7-8 minutes, adding more flour if necessary to prevent sticking (I usually add around 1/4 cup extra). Mix until the dough is supple, stretchy and ever-so-slightly tacky. Scrape the dough into the greased bowl, coat it in the oil and cover. Let it rise for 2 hours or until doubled in size.

If you’re doing it by hand: start to knead the dough a bit in the bowl to get it going. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead for about 10 minutes, or until the dough is supple and stretchy. There should be a slight tack to it when you poke your finger into it. Place the dough into the greased bowl and rotate the to cover in the oil. Cover and let it rise for 2 hours or until doubled in size.

Make the caramelized onions: Place the half moons of onion in a small saucepan over low-medium heat. Add a few thyme leaves at this point if you like. Stir them up here and there to promote even browning. The sizzling sound should be like a faint whisper. Keep stirring them here and there, adding splashes of water to prevent sticking if necessary. Once the onions are super soft, brown, juicy, delicious etc looking, add the splash of sherry vinegar, stir it around and remove pot from the heat. Set aside.

Second rise: Empty the dough out onto your prepared baking sheet. Stretch it out to fit the pan, dimpling it with your fingers (so fun). Once it’s all snug and fitted in the corners, cover the baking sheet and let it rise another hour.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Pre-baking: scatter the thyme leaves, caramelized onions, sunflower seeds and pinches of coarse salt over the top of the dough. Pour the remaining 1/4 cup olive oil over the top as well. Dimple the dough very lightly, allowing the oil to sink into some bits of the dough and slosh around the edges for crisp end-results. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Remove and allow the bread to slightly cool before serving.

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la domestique23/11/2012 - 8:19 pm

I am so with you on the bread thing. It’s easy + so, so rewarding + definitely badass. :) This focaccia looks real good.

jaime @ sweet road24/11/2012 - 9:55 am

All the ingredients here look delicious, I can only imagine how incredibly flavorful this bread might be!

Elizabeth A.24/11/2012 - 11:27 am

Thanks for the reminder, Laura. It’s one of my long term life goals to become a “real” bread baker. And I am so in need of a little “Whole body, whole mind, loaf of bread” right now. Off to the kitchen…

Kathryn25/11/2012 - 2:04 pm

This is just lovely – these flavours are perfect and I’m totally loving baking with spelt flour at the moment. That hint of nuttiness just makes me swoon.

Hope you’re having an awesome vacation!

Katie (The Muffin Myth)26/11/2012 - 3:39 am

Yummm! Isn’t Kim Boyce the best?! I love this version, and just so happen to have a bag of spelt flour sitting in my cupboard. Thanks for sharing another amazing recipe! And jealous of your time in Costa Rica! We’ve gone there several Decembers and had amazing times, but this year it’s rainy Vancouver and time with family instead. Enjoy the sunshine!

Sarah | offbeat & inspired26/11/2012 - 1:03 pm

I love the combination of caramelized onions and herbs. This looks delicious!

mince and type28/11/2012 - 9:24 am

I agree. Everyone should know how to make bread. I’m a big fan of Kim Boyce too! Using whole grain flours is not only healthier but it also tastes better. This looks amazing!

I’m jealous of your Costa Rica vacation!!

Kathryne29/11/2012 - 1:49 am

Hope you are clinkety-clinking some rum on the rocks now, Laura. Yeasted bread intimidates me. I should probably get over it.

sarah30/11/2012 - 12:57 am

Love! So many good things in this bread. I have been putting spelt into everything lately – I love it so much. And caramelized onions! My favorite. xo

Art & Lemons03/12/2012 - 5:46 pm

I’ve had this recipe marked in Good To The Grain for some time. Love that book! Thanks for reminding me I need to get back to my bread habit. I completely agree with you about making bread, it’s the one thing that always comforts and centers me in the kitchen. Cheers to you, enjoy the waves and your time away!

Kasey05/12/2012 - 2:25 pm

Kim Boyce is my baking goddess and I must say that I never baked so much as I have since acquiring her book. I hope you had a lovely time in the tropics! Strangely, I’m enjoying the gray days we’re having here…they sure give me lots of excuses to light my favorite candles, stay home and cuddle up with my cookbooks, and bake…a lot. xo

sweet potato, chipotle + chard cornbread stuffing


Judging from most of the American food mags I’ve been glancing at, stuffing, dressing etc. is a bit of a thing on the table of festive gatherings. There are generally no less than 17 recipes for it in any publication’s holiday issue. There are discussions of technique, pre-drying the bread, never actually stuffing it in the bird, the option of using grains instead, the classic celery-sage-onion-butter profile vs. completely new-fangled renditions (olives! fennel! dates!). It’s a flavour-y starch thing that soaks up the goodness of everything else on the plate, so I guess I can understand the passion behind it.

We’ve had Thanksgiving in Canada a month ago already, but no matter. I’m fairly grateful in a general way, so stuffing can certainly be made appropriate at a moment’s notice. I never go with a set recipe for this holiday meal fixture exactly. Like most of the things I make, it’s more of a feel-y approach. If anyone wanted to know what kind of cuisine I specialize in, that’s your answer: it’s feel-y. It’s incredibly easy to complicate the one life you have. A simple, but focused approach with food remains as a bastion of calm in mine.

Here’s two things I keep in mind throughout this decidedly felt cooking adventure: the bread should be really good (actually a defining characteristic of all of the bread in your life) and fat should be applied with abandon (arguably less appropriate at times throughout your life). That’s it, that’s all.

I went a cornbread route on this version. I had never done that before, but my love of this sweet-savoury treat has always been pretty serious. I was dreaming of its slight grittiness made crisp, paired up with smoky-spicy chipotles, sweet potatoes, garlic and some kind of greens. The chard in the garden continues to be prolific, staring me down from its thick rows every time I look out back. The earth is still soft and those perfectly emerald green and crinkly  leaves, with their defining salty bite, just grow taller. Put the little seed down in springtime and the land gives in the most utter sense; with no expectation of what is owed after all this time. A recognition of a love that intense that can just exist in the world makes my eyes go wide. Stating the obvious: I’m thankful for that. Big time.


sweet potato, chipotle  + chard cornbread stuffing

serves: 4-6
notes: I add some of the cooked chard towards the end of the baking process so that I still get some pretty green bits all through. Also, if cornbread isn’t readily available to you, Bryant Terry’s recipe is one of my favourites (link).

7-8 cups cubed cornbread
1/4 cup + 2 tbsp grapeseed oil, divided (+ extra for greasing/drizzling)
6 sprigs thyme, leaves removed and chopped
1 cooking onion, small dice
1 celery stalk, small dice
1 clove of garlic, minced
3-4 stalks of chard, leaves roughly chopped
1 small sweet potato, peeled, small dice
1-1.5 cups vegetable stock
1 chipotle pepper in adobo + extra adobo sauce (use as much or as little as you want)
juice of 1/2 a lemon
salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Grease an 8 X 11 baking dish, line a baking sheet with parchment and set aside.

Toss the cubed cornbread with 2 tablespoons of the oil, a pinch of the minced thyme, salt and pepper to coat. Place cubes on the parchment lined baking sheet and push into the oven. Bake until bread is golden brown and dried out a bit, about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and dump croutons into a large bowl.

Heat the remaining 1/4 cup of oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the diced onions, celery and remaining chopped thyme. Stir constantly until onions are soft and ever-so-slightly browning, about 4-5 minutes. Add the garlic. Saute until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Start adding the chard. Stir the greens around with the other veg until they begin to wilt a tiny bit and turn bright green. Remove from the heat and scrape into the bowl with the bread cubes, reserving some of the chard for a later addition if you like.

In the same saucepan, place the diced sweet potatoes, chipotle + adobo and vegetable stock over medium heat. The stock should cover the sweet potato dices by an inch. Bring to a boil and simmer until sweet potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper to taste. Mash the sweet potatoes up with the back of a wooden spoon or a potato masher so that you have various sized pieces.

Pour the sweet potato mashy-chunky bits and stock over the cornbread, greens and other vegetables. Stir gently to combine. Spread the whole mixture into the greased 8 x 11 baking dish. Drizzle a bit of oil over the top if you like. Cover with foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove the foil and bake another 20 minutes or until the top is golden brown. If you’ve reserved some of the chard, scatter it over the top with about 10 minutes left of baking.

Serve hot.

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Kathryn15/11/2012 - 6:23 am

Woah…the flavours in this sound intense (in the best possible way). Stuffing is always my favourite part of the meal and this may well be making an appearance on our Christmas table this year. Totally love it.

Katrina @ Warm Vanilla Sugar15/11/2012 - 9:09 am

Yes please! What a delight.

thelittleloaf15/11/2012 - 9:51 am

This sounds absolutely gorgeous. I’ve never been to a Thanksgiving meal but this year some American friends have invited us over and asked me to bring a dish! I might try making my own cornbread then turning it into this…delicious :-)

erin15/11/2012 - 10:57 am

Swiss Chard never ceases to amaze me- it is always there, ready to be eaten. I love the spin you’ve put on stuffing and I do have quite the obsession with sweet potatoes/chipotle.

jaime @ sweet road15/11/2012 - 11:48 am

Yes yes yes! This is what I like to see… combinations of Thanksgiving dishes all thrown into one! The cornbread, the stuffing, and the sweet potatoes. It all gets mixed up on the plate anyways, so why not purposefully and masterfully cook it all together?

Becs@Lay the table15/11/2012 - 6:26 pm

It looks incredible – I love stuffing though probably wouldn’t put chipotle in it for a traditional british roast dinner but I could definitely imagine serving it with something else!

Kasey18/11/2012 - 9:38 pm

I love that you describe your cooking style as ‘feel-y.’ The best cooks I know are ones who cook with feeling – pinch here, a handful here, whatever’s fresh from the market…Thanksgiving is my absolute favorite holiday and while I look forward to a feast, I do appreciate vegetable-packed side dishes. This sounds just perfect!

Leah Sienkowski22/11/2012 - 3:19 pm

Currently in the oven for Thanksgiving dinner. Pumped.

[…] Sweet Potato, Chipotle, + Chard Cornbread Stuffing […]

Michael Phelan26/11/2013 - 2:42 pm

This looks just lovely for thanksgiving. Besides the cornbread, any thoughts on what elements of this dish could be made in advance? Could I bake it for the first 25 minutes with the foil on the night before and then put it in the oven uncovered for the final 20 mins just prior to serving? Perhaps the whole thing would end up too dried on.
Any thoughts or advice you have would be appreciated. Either way, thank you again for your inspired blog and lovely recipes.

Laura Wright28/11/2013 - 11:15 am

Hi Michael, I would definitely assemble the whole thing in the baking dish the night before and then refrigerate it. Bring it to room temperature before baking the next day.
-L